Pacific Pottery Company made insulators for Placerville Humboldt Telegraph line

[Newspaper]

Publication: Sacramento Daily Union

Sacramento, CA, United States
vol. 16, no. 2423, p. 4, col. 2


CITY MANUFACTURES


At the end of the first half of 1858, we laid before our readers an exhibit of the progress of the city in manufactures, from which the following table, showing the different branches, and the number of shops and workmen in each, is made up with corrections to the end of the year:

                                                                                                 No.Shops.         No.Workmen.

Agricultural Implements .......................................................................6                           10

Assaying..............................................................................................2                           —

Billiard Tables......................................................................................3                           12

Book Binding.......................................................................................1 (men and women) 4

Boiler Shops........................................................................................2                           20

Boxes..................................................................................................1                            1

Brick Yards.........................................................................................9                           80

Brooms...............................................................................................1                             9

Buckskin Gloves and Stage Lashes.......................................................l                            —

Confectionery.....................................................................................5                           20

Cooperage..........................................................................................4                             9

Coffee and Spices...............................................................................2                             8

Daguerreotype....................................................................................4                             7

Flour Mills..........................................................................................5                           —

Founderies .........................................................................................3                           41

Gas Works Establishment....................................................................1                             7

Gas Fittings.........................................................................................2                            2

Glue....................................................................................................1                            —

Guns and Rifles....................................................................................3                            8

Grain Sacks.........................................................................................3                            8

Goldsmithing.......................................................................................1                             3

Grease (Axle).....................................................................................1                             2

Hats...................................................................................................2                            10

Harness.............................................................................................25                           65

Hydraulic Fittings................................................................................1                            —

Iron Doors and Shutters......................................................................4                           10

Mechanical Dentistry...........................................................................7                           —

Mattresses..........................................................................................4                            8

Marble Cutting....................................................................................2                            5

Miners' Picks......................................................................................2                           10

Potteries..............................................................................................1                           7

Quartz Mills.........................................................................................1                           8

Saddle Trees (California).....................................................................4                           9

Sash and Doors...................................................................................4                           7

Smut Machines....................................................................................1                           3

Stoves (Mississippi).............................................................................1                          —

Saddle Stirrups (California)..................................................................1                           2

Soap...................................................................................................1                            3

Soda Water........................................................................................ 3                          —

Tin Ware............................................................................................14                          50

Vinegar, Syrups, Cordials, etc..............................................................4                            6

Wagons and Carriages........................................................................35                        140

Water Pipes.........................................................................................1                            5

Willow Ware.......................................................................................1                           —

The above list of city manufactures was compiled during the dullest period of the year, and when the Fraser excitement was at its hight [sic] height. The different kinds of manufactural operations were 46 in number, and the total number of shops in which these various arts were carried on, was 179; total number of hands employed at that time, 608. As will be seen by our revision of the separate figures to represent the working condition of the trades at this time, there have been but few changes in the catalogue. The amount of business done since it was first made, and the prospects for the future, are vastly more encouraging. We present the following statements:

 

TANNERIES. — Three tanneries are now in operation. The amount of business done in 1858 is not large in comparison with other years. One of our tanneries has perhaps, a larger capacity than any in the northern part of the State, employing from 10 to fifteen hands in the busiest time. The number of hides tanned at Robel's tannery during the year may be set down at about 4,000, and a similar number of sheep skins. At Miller's tannery but little has been done, owing to the Fraser exodus. The number of hides which he is capable of turning out in the course of a year is 400. Greenleaf & Co. have taken the Sacramento Tannery, and recently commenced operations with a stock of about 1,000 hides, mountain cured. They will turn ont 8,000 pounds of leather, mostly skirting, this month. Capacity of vats, about 6,000 per annum.

 

HARNESS. — Fall business in our harness shops has been fully as brisk, until within a month past, as in years gone by. The present is the dull season, and a good many workmen are idle. The estimated capital employed in harness making in Sacramento is $100,000.

 

HAMS, BACON, AND LARD. — Within the past month one of the most extensive pork packing establishements ever started in California has been opened in the city. Although occupying temporary premises, and with only half the amount of room they require, Wallerton & Co. have killed and packed from 100 to 500 hogs per week since they commenced business, and now turn out from their smoke-house an average of 60 hogs per weekly in hams and bacon. They also manufacture weekly 1,000 pounds of very superior lard. Hogs are worth from $10 to $10.50, and are bought on the hoof for the above trade. Bacon and hams, city cured, sell at about the price of the imported article.

G. Cooper, who has long been engaged Inthe cure of fish, hams, bacon, etc, has, during the year, erected an extensive establishment on the bank of the Sacramento river, just above Washington, exclusively for the business. He commenced operations on the 7th of November, since which time he has killed, cured, and smoked 1,700 head. The smoking is carried on on his premises near the Water Works. Aside from this and operations above noticed in regard to fish, he has cured and smoked about 15 tons of herring, caught near San Francisco, which are pronounced an excellent article. Of other establishments, on a less extensive scale, in different parts of the city, we have no data of general interest.

 

WAGONS, CARRAIGES, ETC. — Wagon making has been a prosperous business during the past year in spite of the gold epidemic. All the shops have been busy. The estimated manufacture of wagons and vehicles of all description, during the year ending July last, was 750; capital employed, about $200,000. The Spring prospects are highly favorable.

 

FOUNDRIES. — Of the three foundries within the city — the Sacramento Iron Works, Eureka Foundry and Union Foundry — have been furnished with particulars of the yearly operations of the former only. The Sacramento Iron Works was established in 1852, and has been gradually increasing in facilities and magnitude to the present time.

The machine shop is a brick building 85 feet front, three stories high, and 115 feet deep. They have added to their stock of tools, the past year, 1double-headed engine lathe, 30 feet long, swinging 38 inches diameter. This is acknowledged to be the finest tool af the kind in the State. They have also added a superior bolt cutting machine, capable of cutting bolts from 1 inch to 2 1/2 inches in diameter, and of any length required.

They now have in their machine shop 9 engine lathes, capable of swinging, from 1 to 8 feet in diameter and will turn shafts from 4 to 25 feet long; 4 drill and chuck lathes; 2 bolt cutting machines, and auxiliary tools too numerous to mention. They have in their blacksmith shop 8 forges, the blast of which is created by a fan blower, driven by steam; also, a trip hammer — only one in operation in the State.

In their pattern shop, they have circular and scroll saws, turning lathes, etc., which makes the establishment quite complete in all its parts. They have made, at this establishment, during the past year, two hundred and fifty tons of iron castings, and about four thousand pounds of brass castings. They have, also, manufactured and sold ten steam engines from ten to forty horse power each — fifteen sets of machinery, for quartz mills; four flour mills, about fifty wind mills, horse powers, threshing machines, and a great variety of other kinds of machinery.

They have also made 50 of Bertola's gold amalgamators — better known as Judge Chambers' process — for saving gold in quartz, and which is believed will create a revolution in quartz mining. The above machines are inoperation at the Bay State Quartz Mill, at American Bar. They employ in these works, on an average, about 40 men.

 

FURNITURE. — In the same building with one of the Sacramento steam saw and planing mills, is a manufacturer of furniture, such as bedsteads, bureaus, etc, for the trade in light and cheap articles of those descriptions in our city. He has only recently commenced, bnt has quite as much as he can do. Most of his work is machine made, and as the lumber (sugar pine) costs but a trifle more than in the East, he can manufacture quite as cheaply here as there. He makes of bedsteads about 4 dozen per month, selling to the furniture dealers.

 

MILLSAWS. —A small workshop for the repairing, teeth making and filing of mill and other large saws was opened about 6 weeks ago. About $600 was put in the business, which amount, though small, represents the only investment in this kind of workmanship, north of San Francisco. The parties have all the work they can do, and during their short business course have repaired about twenty large saws.

 

BOXES, CALIFORNIA STIRRUPS AND PACK SADDLES. — The box maker in the premises last mentioned, during the fruit season turned out 800 packing boxes per week. The average manufacture of boxes is now between 200 and 800 per week, and of pack saddles and stirrups 6 dozen per month each.

 

GRAIN SACKS.— About 500,000 grain sacks are furnished by the three sewing shops in this city, from 11 machines running from June to August.

 

PLOWS, ETC. — There are now 6 shops where plows, horse rakes and other agricultural implements are made. About 650 plows were made at 4 shops during the year ending in July last.

 

SALT. — About 150 tons of salt have been ground during the last Summer and Fall at the Pioneer Flouring Mill. Smaller amounts have been ground at one or two of the other mills and at the salt grinding establishment on K street.

 

POTTERIES.— We have two potteries within the city limits or the immediate neighborhood, both of which are now conducted under the same proprietorship. The Pacific Stoneware Pottery (Hevener & Walter proprietors) is situated at the corner of N and Thirtieth streets. The lot is 160 by 320 feet; the shop 30 by 70 feet, with drying room in the upper story; the kiln is of the capacity of 1,400 gallons. During the past year the establishment has manufactured and sold all the ware to the full capacity of the works, about two-thirds being shipped to San Francisco. The ware has been tested at the acid works near San Francisco, and pronounced equal to the best chemical ware manufactured at the East. Ware for the chemical works is now being manufactured at the Pottery. The Insulators for the Placerville and Humboldt Telegraph were also manufactured at this establishment. The proprietors have now on the ground materials for the construction of another kiln of the capacity of 1,500 gallons. The ware is sold at a price 20 per cent, lets than the cost of imported ware — in fact, about driven the latter out of market. The Sacrame.to Pottery (or latterly known as Pipe Works) is situated on the line of J street, just outside the city limits on a lot 320 by 340 feet. The shop is 100 by 16, one story, and connected therewith is a shed 30 by 80 feet, used for storing during manufacturing. It is furnished with two kilns, one of 1,400 and the other of 1,800 gallons capacity. The establishment during the past year has been carried on successively by Charles Taylor, S. C. Bruce and H. C. Swain. Within a few weeks it has been purchased, as above indicated, by Hevener & Walter, who intend to put it in operation and make principally Rockingham ware, also flower pots, water pipe, etc. The name has been changed to that of tie Pacific Rockingham Pottery.

 

GAS WORKS —The Sacramento Gas Works, located near the mouth ofthe American river, continues in successful operation. As an indication of their degree of prosperity we may mention that their list of consumers, and the demand for gas, is increasing steadily and rapidly. The manufacture of gas was commenced on the 17th of December, 1855. The station meter, on the 31st of December, 1856, indicated amanufacture of of 5,278,000 cubic feet. The manufacture, during the year 1857, amounted to 7,183,000 feet; and during the past year, as indicated by the meter yesterday, 8,315,510 feet. To appreciate the increase in consumption, it should be remembered that the street lights(voracious customers) were lighted during a portion of the years 1856-57, but not durine the past year. At the close of 1857, about 3 miles of main (4,6 and 8 inch) had been laid. During the past year the main has been extended laterally about 2,200 feet, to supply private residences, etc.; the old benches have been removed from the retort house, and new benches constructed on a firm foundation, other (temporary) benches being erected outside the building to be used during the repairs. The latter are now inuse, together with two of the new benches, in the retort house. The improvements during the year have been effected at an expense of $9,000.

 

FLOURING MILLS. — The number of flouring mills remains as during the year 1857, 5 in number, having aggregate manufacturing capacity of about 700 barrels per day. The mills are as follows: Bay State, Lambard, Haxall, Pioneer, and Phoenix. The Lambard Mill — the largest — is capable of manufacturing 300 barrels per day, and since June has averaged about 250 barrels per day. The Bay State has a capacity of 162 barrels per day and has averaged 145 barrels since the completion of improvements. The Pioneer — capacity 150 barrels — commenced running, July 1st, and has run steadily since — a portion of the time, night and day. The Haxall — capacity, 75 barrels — was recently overhauled and improved; but of the extent of operations we are not advised. The Phoenix — capacity, 100 barrels — aside from the manufacture of flour (about 25 barrels per day) has been engaged in grinding buckwheat, barley and corn. The sales of the mill, in ground barley and corn meal, averages from 50 to 100 ton