Events in the Glass Industry for 1944; Corning Glass Works events listed

[Trade Journal]

Publication: Glass Factory Year Book and Directory

Pittsburgh, PA, United States
p. 168-180, col. 1


Outstanding Events In Glass Industry

Of the Nation During the Year 1944

 

JANUARY

Amory Houghton, chairman of the board, Corning Glass Works, is named to the 1944 board of directors of the National Association of Manufacturers.

The Fourth Regional Office, National Labor Relations Board at Philadelphia, certifies the American Flint Glass Workers' Union as the exclusive bargaining agent for the Wellsboro, Pa., plant of Corning Glass Works. Formation of Local 1101 begins at the plant.

The working contract which will affect about 6,000 employes [sic] employees at the three plants of the Corning Glass Works in Corning, N. Y., is signed by representatives of the company and the American Flint Glass Workers' Union.

FEBRUARY

The Regional War Labor Board denies, "without prejudice," an appeal of the Flint union from an earlier decision of the WLB, limiting wage increases to three cents an hour for about 1,100 employes [sic] employees of the Macbeth-Evans Division of the Corning Glass Works at Charleroi, Pa.

Russell L. Test, associated with Corning Glass Works for 25 years, resigns to go with the Phoenix Glass Company where he will engage in post-war planning.

Amory Houghton is re-elected chairman of the board of Corning Glass Works, and Glen Cole is renamed president at annual board meeting.

The Flint union loses out in an election ordered by the NLRB when employes [sic] employees of the Charleroi, Pa., plant vote in favor of the CIO Federation of Glass, Ceramic and Silica Sand Workers of America as their collective bargaining representative. It marks the first time a CIO union has been chosen to act in such a capacity in any division of Corning employes [sic] employees. Up to this time the Federation has been established chiefly in flat glass plants.

MARCH

Lawrence King, with Corning Glass Works since 1941, is named managing director of Corning Glass Works of South America, a wholly owned subsidiary.

Joseph R. Palme, personnel director of the Corning Glass Works for the last three years, is appointed assistant to Harry M. Hosier, vice president in charge of industrial relations.

APRIL

Wellsboro, Pa., plant of Corning Glass Works wins right to add star to its "E" flag.

The Corning Division of Corning Glass Works receives Army-Navy production award for third time.

MAY

W. W. Oakley, Jr., is advanced in Charleroi, Pa, Pa., Division of Corning Glass Works to head standards department.

JUNE

Dr. Jesse T. Littleton, vice president and associate director of research at Corning Glass Works, is awarded honorary degree of doctor of science by University of Wisconsin.

WLB approves certain provisions of labor contract between Flints and Corning Glass Works. Although more than two-thirds of the provisions have been in effect in Corning plants since contract was negotiated, some provisions could not become effective until approval from WLB.

The President's Cup, symbolic of the best safety record attained in an inter-plant competition of six Corning Glass Works divisions last year, is awarded company's Wellsboro, Pa., plant.

JULY

A three-man panel of the NLRB in Pittsburgh assumes role of mediator, following complicated dispute involving interests of about 1,500 employes [sic] emplyoyees of Charleroi, Pa., plant of Corning Glass Works, and wins amicable settlement.

WLB approves attendance bonus as part of base pay at Corning Glass Works.

Corad, a new device produced by Corning Glass Works, permits greater control of distillation processes in development of war materials.

Announcement is made of details concerning commercial production of silicones by executives of Corning Glass Works and Dow Chemical Company. It is said the silicones represent a century's research to utilize silicon and oxygen in production of new temperature-resistant materials.

AUGUST

Frederick Kraissel, Corning Glass Works technologist for years, dies at summer home.

Corning Glass Works issues "Five Years of Wartime Service" a folder explaining some problems confronted by the company and how they were met.

SEPTEMBER

William J. Belknap, Jr., manager of market research department of Corning Glass Works, is made assistant to Charles D. LaFollette, vice president and director of sales.

Corning Glass Works acquires large interest in Vidraria Santa Marina, top-ranking glass company in Brazil. William H. Curtiss, vice president of Corning, is named president of the South American subsidiary.

OCTOBER

Corning Glass Works wins National Security award for "superior plant protection and safety programs."

William H. Curtiss, vice president and secretary, and William C. Taylor, vice president and director of glass technology, Corning Glass Works, leave for South America to survey developments in Corning interests in Brazil and Argentina, with possible plans to advance negotiations for similar interests in Chili.

NOVEMBER

Parkersburg, W. Va., plant of Corning Glass Works is awarded Army-Navy "E," the eighth "E" won by the Corning organization.

Raymond A. Wasson, assistant manager of factory "A" of Corning Glass Works in Corning, N. Y., is made manager of the Parkersburg, W. Va., plant, and Dr. W. A. Wishart, whose place he takes is made production manager at Charleroi, Pa., plant.

Army-Navy production award is received by the three Corning, N. Y., plants of Corning Glass Works, for the fourth time in two years.

Corning Glass Works makes and fabricates 135 feet of glass piping cut into five 27-foot lengths for southern rayon manufacturer, engaged in war work. The tubes, longest sections ever made, are specified because of their superior chemical resistance.

 

DECEMBER

Amory Houghton, board chairman of Corning Glass Works, resumes activities with the company on his return to this country after serving for a year as deputy chief administrator of the Mission for Economic Affairs in London.

W. W. Oakley, Jr., in charge of standardization of operations at the Charleroi, Pa., plant of Corning Glass Works, resigns to take another position.

Dr. J. H. Munier, former member of Corning Glass Works Main plant laboratory, is appointed manager of the firm's Bradford, Pa., plant.

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Keywords:Corning Glass Works
Researcher notes: 
Supplemental information: 
Researcher:Bob Stahr
Date completed:February 7, 2011 by: David Wiecek;