Events in the Glass Industry for 1947; Corning Glass Works events listed

[Trade Journal]

Publication: Glass Factory Year Book and Directory

Pittsburgh, PA, United States
p. 171-186, col. 1


Outstanding Events In Glass Industry

Of the Nation During the Year 1947

 

JANUARY

Corning Glass Works announces plans for immediate start on new warehouse in Corning, N. Y.

Corning Glass names Harry S. Hower to newly created position of manager of the firm's export department with headquarters in New York.

The Leaside, Ont., plant of Corning Glass gets into production of the first heat resistant glass oven ware manufactured in the Dominion of Canada.

FEBRUARY

Eugene W. Ritter, vice president and manager Consumer Products Division of Corning Glass Works, is named president of Corning Glass Works of South America. He succceeds William H. Curtiss, who continues as vice president and secretary of Corning.

Federation of Glass, Ceramic and Silica Sand Workers withdraws petition to National Labor Relations Board for an election to determine a collective bargaining agent at Corning Glass.

Corning estimates that 1946 sales were highest in history of company.

Corning Glass announces plans for new Pyrex unit at Muskogee, Okla.

Corning makes known that 15-year-old gatherer blew first bulb for Edison while skilled workers stood around arguing over best methods to be employed.

W. C. Taylor, Corning vice president, is named a director of Corhart Refractories, Inc., in which Corning has a controlling interest.

MARCH

Brig. Gen. Boykin C. Wright is elected a member of Corning Glass. He succeeds Eugene W. Ritter, vice president, who will make his home in Buenos Aries where he will devote full time to duties as president of Corning Glass Works of South America.

Corning Glass names Benjamin S. Pierson vice president of its Leaside, Ont., plant. He recently was made manager of the Consumer Products Division.

Corning Glass sales of $55,852,000 in 1946, a record, tops previous year by 16 per cent.

Arthur S. Taylor is named by Corning Glass to succeed John W. Romig as general sales manager of the Technical Products Division.

L. B. Webb to manage new plant of Corning Glass Works at Muskogee, Okla.

APRIL

Officers and directors of Corning Glass Works and subsidiaries are re-elected.

Fred A. Walker, general storekeeper for Corning Glass for 30 years, dies in Corning Hospital.

C. John Phillips, author of "Glass the Miracle Maker," leaves Corning to become manager of product development for Pittsburgh Plate.

MAY

Corning Glass lets construction contract for two new buildings at Charleroi, Pa., plant which will provide additional melting capacity for expansion of firm's television bulb program.

Corning announces fourth step in South American expansion with purchase of minority interest in Cristaleria Peldar S. A. of Colombia.

JUNE

Corning Glass announces development of new glass, which can receive permanent color photographic prints with three dimensional effect through prescribed use of ultrviolet light and heat.

Corning names Robert W. Foster controller of Consumer Products Division.

SEPTEMBER

Government sues Owens-Corning Fiberglsa, Owens-Illinois and Corning Glass Works charging violation of Sherman Antitrust Act.

Corning Glass names C. A. Overstrom plant supervisor of production planning for Parkersburg, W. Va., plant.

OCTOBER

Corning Glass names Dr. John M. J. Collins medical director, succeeding Dr. Lewis Graham, resigned.

NOVEMBER

Members of American Flint Glass Workers' Union at Corning, N.Y., and Wellsboro, Pa., plants of Corning Glass receive wage increase of eight cents an hour, bringing total boost in last two years to 31 cents an hour.

Non-supervisory office workers at Corning Glass given increase of $3 a week, or six per cent.

DECEMBER

Herman F. Eilers, 68, retired, mechanical and electrical engineer of Corning Glass where he was associated 28 years, dies at Corning, N. Y., home.

--

Keywords:Corning Glass Works
Researcher notes: 
Supplemental information: 
Researcher:Bob Stahr
Date completed:October 15, 2012 by: Bob Stahr;