1957 year in review; Corning Glass Co. events listed

[Trade Journal]

Publication: American Glass Review Glass Factory Directory Issue

Pittsburgh, PA, United States
p. 15-26, col. 1


The Year 1957 in Review

 

...a month-by-month recapitulation of the

news highlights of 1957 in the American glass

industry, as recorded in the pages of the

AMERICAN GLASS REVIEW.

February

 

Russell Brittingham is elected president of the Pittsburgh Corning Corporation, succeeding Pittsburgh Plate board chairman Harry B. Higgins. Named to succeed Mr. Brittingham as director of purchases for Corning Glass Works is Thomas S. Wood, Jr.

April

 

Paul T. Clark, general manager of Corning Glass Works' Technical Products Division, is elected a vice-president of the firm. John Monteith Gates, vice-president of Corning-owned Stueben Glass Inc., is appointed director for design for all Corning operations.

May

 

Pyroceram, a family of tough, heat-resistant materials harder than steel, lighter than aluminum, and nine times stronger than plate glass, is unveiled by Corning Glass Works. The materials are made by adding special nucleating agents to the raw materials of a glass batch and then heat treating.

July

Donald W. Shoemaker is appointed manager of manufacturing for Corhart Refractories Company, Inc., Corning subsidiary.

John S. Muller takes over as Pyroceram coordinator at Corning to handle the research, production, and sales activities of this new family of crystalline materials.

August

Edward C. Leibig is elected president of Corhart Refractories Company, Inc., Louisville, Ky., wholly-owned subsidiary of Corning Glass Works. His predecessor, Hugh L. Kline, takes over as field sales manager of the television sales department at Corning.

A veteran of 44 years in the glass industry, George D. Macbeth, retires as vice-president and controller of Corning Glass Works.

October

Construction is begun on a 28-story "tower of glass" being erected in New York City by Corning Glass.

December

A wage increase of seven-and-a-half cents or three-and-a-half per cent, whichever is greater, is agreed to in contract negotiations between Corning and the American Flint Glass Workers' Union.

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Keywords:Corning Glass Works
Researcher notes: 
Supplemental information: 
Researcher:Bob Stahr
Date completed:June 1, 2012 by: Bob Stahr;