Men of Muncie, F.L. Shinkle life story

[Newspaper]

Publication: The Muncie Daily Herald

Muncie, IN, United States


MEN OF MUNCIE.


Who Have Helped to Make the City of Muncie.


The Thirty-Seventh of a Series of Biographical Sketches That Will Appear In the Herald From Day to Day.

By vim and force of character, F. L. Shinkle, the subject of this sketch has forged his way far to the front among the successful business men of Muncie. He is a native of Ohio having been born at Nigginsport, Brown county, Sept. 23, 1842. His father, Charles Shinkle, was also a native of the Buckeye state and was born at Nigginsport in 1817. He (Charles) was a schoolmate of U. S. Grant at Georgetown. The two separated, Grant to go to West Point, Mr. Shinkle to run a flat boat to New Orleans. They saw no more of each other until they met in front of Vicksburg in the fall of í62. Charles Shinkle moved to Covington, Ky., and went to steam boating shortly after his son, F. L., was born. He followed this business until his death in 1886.

Mr. Shinkle, Jr., attended the schools of his home town and obtained a fair education. When quite young he started out in life for himself. Going into the river service he became a pilot. He learned the Ohio and Mississippi rivers as far down as New Orleans. As captain and pilot he served through the war and was in some of the fiercest engagements, such as Belmont where Grant earned his first laurels, Donaldsonville, Johnsonville, Island No. 10, Memphis and the campaign that resulted in the fall of Vicksburg. He was in the Red River expedition and took part INSERT PICTURE/IMAGE HERE in quite a number of spirited fights. He was also in several battles on the White river. Mrs. Shinkle is a close observer, has an excellent memory and is in possession of a large fund of information. He is an excellent conversationalist and can recount many interesting tales of army and river life. He has a large collection of war relics and mementoes, one being a a news, . . . [illegible text] . . . printed on one side of common wax paper, bearing date July 4, 1868, printed at Vicksburg just before the surrender.

In 1873 he left boating and went into the drug business at Casey, Ill., and remained in the business there until 1892, when he left that place and came to Muncie. He purchased one-fourth of a block on Madison and Fremont street and built a large and commodious room. He removed his stock from Casey to this room where he still remains, doing a good business, adding to the activity and thrift of the city. In connection with his drug business, he is also a manufacturing pharmacist, making fine inks, mucilage and several specialties in pharmaceutical science. In the summer of 1892 he built a handsome two story residence close to his place of business where he now resides.

He was married in Jan. 1864 to Miss Sinah C. Crider of Oldam Co., Ky. They have had five children, three of which are now living. One of the daughters died at the old homestead in Kentucky in 1877 at the age of 8 years. Another married daughter died in Omaha, Neb., at the age of 28 years. Mr. Shinkleís mother died last July at the age of 71 years, his father having died 10 years previous at nearly the same age. Mr. Shinkle is a Knight templar also vice-president of the Indiana Traveling Menís association for the 13th district and also vice-president of Traveling Menís Protective Association Past R. Mr. Shinkle is a good level headed business man and is not wanting in any of those qualities that go to make up a good citizen.

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Keywords:Hemingray
Researcher notes: 
Supplemental information: 
Researcher:Roger Lucas / Bob Stahr
Date completed:October 21, 2011 by: Deb Reed Fowler;