AFGWU dispute over jurisdiction for mold makers

[Trade Journal]

Publication: The Glassworker

Pittsburgh, PA, United States
vol. 35, no. 37, p. 1,4, col. 4,1


JURISDICTION DISPUTE IS SETTLED

A. F. G. W. U. IS WINNER OVER I. A. M.


Committee Reaffirms the Finding of the

American Federation of Labor and

Recommends the Transfer of Machinists

Union Mold Makers to the

A. F. G. W. U.


THE DECISION IS FINAL.


The dispute of several years standing between the American Flint Glass Workers' Union and the International Association of Machinists concerning jurisdiction over the men making molds for molding glassware has at last been settled, victory perching on the banners of the A. F. G. W. U.

The committee appointed to report on the dispute has done so, re-affirming the decision of the American Federation of Labor giving the A. F. G. W. U. jurisdiction over the making of all molds used in the manufacture of glassware, and recommending that all members of the machinists union working on molds for molding glassware shall be transferred to the A. F. G. W. U. without initiation fee on or before January 1, 1918, and that the A. F. G. W. U. shall bring about the affiliation with the I. A. M. of all machinists employed at machinists work in flint glass factories on or before the same date.

The official report of the committee is as follows:

Bloomington, Ill., May 8, 1917.

To the American Federation of Labor, the American Flint Glass Workers' Union and the International Association of Machinists:

In pursuance of action by the Seattle convention of the American Federation of Labor, a committee was created to investigate the subject of the rights of the jurisdiction dispute between the I. A. of M. and the A. F. G. W. U. over the men making molds for molding glassware. The committee consisted of John B. Lennon, B. F. Lamb and Fred P. Houck. Glass factories and mold shops were investigated at Alton, Ill., Toledo, O., Newark, O., Cambridge, O., and Cincinnati, O., and the following report and finding is hereby submitted:

During 1883, what was known as the Mold Makers Society was organized; during 1885 they were admitted to and became a department of the A. F. G. W. U. and worked in mold shops under the jurisdiction of the A. F. G. W. U. from 1885 to 1902, when the A. F. G. W. U. withdrew from the American Federation of Labor. During this period of time 1885 to 1902 no dispute as to jurisdiction over mold makers for molding glasswares arose and jurisdiction was exercised solely by the A. F. G. W. U.

On October 21, 1912, the application of the A. F. G. W. U. for reaffiliation was favorably considered by the Executive Council of the A. F. of L. and the charter was issued over the protest of the I. A. of M. In the jurisdiction claims of the A. F. G. W. U. conceded by the A. F. of L. in the issuance of this charter the following appears:

"The control of glass engraving, cutting, and the making of all molds to be used for molding glasswares."

This sketch of the history of this contention is conclusive evidence that the American Federation of Labor has decided that the making of all molds to be used for molding glasswares belongs exclusively under the jurisdiction of the A. F. G. W. U.

Your committee therefore reaffirms the decision of the Federation to-wit: "That the making of all molds to be used for molding glasswares" is under the jurisdiction of the A. F. G. W. U. and shall be so recognized by all unions affiliated with the A. F. of L.

Your committee further recommends that all members of the Machinists Union working as mold makers on molds used for molding glasswares shall, on or before January 1, 1918, be transferred to the A. F. G. W. U. without initiation fee.

The A. F. G. W. U. shall bring about the affiliation with the I. A. of M. of all machinists employed at machinists' work in flint glass factories under the jurisdiction of the A. F. G. W. U. on or before January 1, 1918.

That in case of demand for mold makers to work in mold shops covered by the jurisdiction of the A. F. G. W. U. that cannot be filled by mold makers members of the A. F. G. W. U., the I. A. of M. shall be requested by the officers of the A. F. G. W. U. to furnish the class of men needed, who upon being employed are to become, members of the A. F. G. W. U.

Your committee finds a general similarity in the work done by machinists and mold makers, but owing to rights of priority, and the fact that the A. F. G. W. U. is now and always has been in large measure an industrial union,, a necessary and component part of which is mold makers who are a necessary element to the preservation of union wages, hours of labor and working conditions in the glass industry, most earnestly recommend the adoption of this report and the earnest co-operation of the two unions at interest in carrying it into effect.

(Signed) JOHN B. LENNON, Treasurer,

American Federation of Labor

FRED'K P. HOUCK.

Member of Mold Making Department American Flint Glass

Workers' Union.

--

Keywords:General
Researcher notes: 
Supplemental information: 
Researcher:Bob Stahr
Date completed:November 24, 2008 by: Bob Stahr;