Detroit Electrical Works article from the Detroit Tribune

[Trade Journal]

Publication: Electrical Review

New York, NY, United States
vol. 9, no. 23, p. 3, col. 4


A New But Already Important Detroit

Industry.

We take the following from our esteemed Detroit contemporary, the Daily Tribune:

The manufacture of electrical instruments did not assume anything like large proportions in this city prior to 1883. The industry has made rapid strides since that time, the volume of trade in 1886 being 60 per cent. larger than that of the previous year. One hundred and fifty skilled workmen now find employment in the manufacture of electrical goods in Detroit. The trade is influenced by three sources of demand telephone construction, telegraph construction and general building. The past year was characterized by a universally large amount of high grade house building throughout the West and the demand for electrical furnishings stimulated the business. Telephone and telegraph construction was only fairly large. The manufacturers are generally well pleased with the present condition of trade and the prospects.

DETROIT ELECTRICAL WORKS.

This concern was incorporated in May, 1876. It now occupies large and very comfortable quarters at Seventh and Woodbridge streets. The officers of the company are: Hugh McMillan, president; W. A. Jackson, vice-president and treasurer; W. H. McKinlock, secretary; F. E. Fisher, manager. Five-sixths of the men engaged in the business in Detroit find employment with this firm. The establishment is a model of neatness and thorough equipment. Secretary McKinlock reports the outlook exceedingly bright and that the works have enough orders on hand to carry them along three months. Nearly all the apparatus used by electric lights concerns is manufactured by the Detroit electrical works, which has agents in all the large cities of the United States.

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Keywords:Detroit Electrical Works : Frank Fisher
Researcher notes: 
Supplemental information: 
Researcher:Bob Stahr
Date completed:July 2, 2009 by: Bob Stahr;